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World Voice Weekend: Exploring the Voice in Acting & Movement

There’s nothing quite as awful as listening to someone present information in a monotone (Anyone? Anyone?) or seeing someone performing a scene where their affect doesn’t quite match what they’re doing.

World Voice Weekend isn’t just about singing and listening to singing, but all kinds of voice use. How do you use your voice when you’re telling a story? How does your voice reflect your physical actions? How do they work together? During World Voice Weekend, two acting coaches will present exciting and creative sessions on becoming a more engaging actor – in two very different ways.

At 11am (ET) on Saturday, April 17, acting coach Izzie Baumann will be coming to us from Germany to present a workshop on Using the Voice in Storytelling. Izzie’s goal for the workshop is to “have every student leave with a smile on their face.” Izzie’s session will focus on the magic that happens when story analysis and vocal technique come together. Active participation is encouraged, and a handout will be sent to all participants after the weekend concludes.

At 1:30pm (ET) on Sunday, April 18, St. Louis-based actor Matt Bender will present a session on Putting in The Effort the Laban Way. The Laban method, created by choreographer and movement researcher Rudolf Laban, offers an efficient and effective system for performers to analyze and create characters from the outside in. It’s perfect for any performer who wants to add more grounded, dynamic movement to their performance. Matt will also be providing an overview of the workshop, which will be sent to all participants after the weekend concludes.

These are just two of the terrific sessions that Mezzoid Voice Studio has planned for World Voice Weekend. In addition to acting, join us for vocal explorations doing mind/body activities (Yoga and the Alexander Technique), warmups and cooldowns, masterclasses with Broadway actors Christian Borle and Adrianna Hicks, concerts with internationally known performers, and tips on vocal health for the performer.

For more information or to register, check out World Voice Weekend or contact Mezzoid Voice Studio (especially if you are a student, or a member of NATS or SECO or Somatic Voicework™or if Christine just likes you)
to see if you qualify for a discount code. 

 

Published by Mezzoid Voice Studio

Christine Thomas-O'Meally, a mezzo soprano and voice teacher currently based in the Baltimore-DC area, has performed everything from the motets of J.S. Bach to the melodies of Irving Berlin to the minimalism of Philip Glass. As an opera singer and actress, she has appeared with companies such as Charm City Players, Spotlighters Theatre, Chicago Opera Theater, Opera Theater of Northern Virginia, Opera North, the Washington Savoyards, In Tandem Theatre, Windfall Theater, The Young Victorian Theater of Baltimore, and Skylight Opera Theatre. She created the role of The Woman in Red in Dominick Argento’s Dream of Valentino in its world premiere with the Washington Opera and Mary Pickersgill in O'er the Ramparts at its world premiere during the Bicentennial of Battle of Baltimore at the Community College of Baltimore County. Other roles include Mrs. Paroo in Music Man, Mother Abbess in Sound of Music, Dorabella in Cosi Fan Tutte, Marcellina in Le Nozze di Figaro, both Hansel and the Witch in Hansel & Gretel, and many roles in Gilbert & Sullivan operettas. Her performance as the Housekeeper in Man of La Mancha was honored with a WATCH award nomination. Ms. Thomas-O'Meally received an M.M. in vocal performance from the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore. She regularly attends master classes and workshops in both performance and vocal pedagogy, and is certified in all three Levels of Somatic Voicework™ The LoVetri Method. Her students have performed on national and international tours of Broadway productions, at prestigious conservatories, and in regional theater throughout the country.

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